Monthly Archives: March 2014

Bags Beg for Attention!

Hi and welcome back to Attentionology for K – 5 Teachers! Bags are more than totes in the hands of a gifted teacher. Bags are BIG attention-getting tools. Colorful, interesting, fun and funny bags prompt curiosity in children. “What’s in the

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What’s Trending? Mindfulness in Elementary Schools to Help Kids Sustain Concentration

Mid-Week Focus this week features mindfulness, a trending tool to help children sustain concentration in school. Benefits of mindfulness? Huge. Reports are that students who learn to practice mindfulness gain the ability to pay closer attention, calm themselves, and stay focused

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Another Cool Attention-Getting Tool – Host a Let’s Go Loony Day!

Hi and welcome back to Attentionology for K – 5 Teachers! Basketball fans, at least in the US and maybe elsewhere, love to participate in “March Madness.” The name, “March Madness” even catches the attention of those who don’t care for

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Posted in Attentionology for K-5 Teachers

Puppets Make Perfect Teacher Assistants!

Mid-Week Focus this week takes Attentionology readers to the wonderful world of puppets. Puppets make perfect teacher assistants! Here’ s the most important tip that teachers need to know about using puppets as teaching assistants… …It’s easy to do! Small

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Barbara Cleary has been serving as a resource to hundreds of educators for more than 25 years. An award-winning writer, producer, teacher, and trainer, Barbara’s focus is on offering easy, fun tools and tricks that support K-5 curricula and assist teachers with classroom management.
Quick tips for common classroom conundrums: K-5
Situation: Students are having trouble writing connecting sentences between the beginning, middle and end of a story.

Solution: Show toy airplanes, pretending to make them "take off" across notebook paper. Explain to the class that stories, like airplanes, require clear "flight paths."

Related Posts: Become the Classroom of the Traveling Story!